Featured Jazz Articles

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Interview

Kenny Washington: From the Ninth Ward to the World Stage

Read "Kenny Washington: From the Ninth Ward to the World Stage" reviewed by Mark Robbins


As a result of past visits to jny: Norfolk, Kenny Washington has amassed a large following of fans here, so it was no surprise that tickets sold out when the Virginia Arts Festival announced that he would be the first guest of the post-Covid season. As one of the best male jazz vocalist singing today, Kenny had a busy traveling schedule, both in the United States and Europe, when it all came to a sudden stop. Live venues closed, some ...

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What is Jazz?

Tuesday Night Jams at the Owl: A 25 Year Legacy in Seattle

Read "Tuesday Night Jams at the Owl: A 25 Year Legacy in Seattle" reviewed by Paul Rauch


Traditionally, the jam session in jazz has provided an outlet for artistic growth and musical connections, for younger musicians to play with more established artists. The oral tradition that has allowed the music to evolve and grow generationally lives at the community jam session. It is a fertile meeting place and proving ground for both established players and newcomers. Most importantly, sessions uphold the values of community and fellowship. While the overall vibe in modern times is infinitely more inclusive ...

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History of Jazz

Clifford Brown’s Trumpet and One Summer in Atlantic City

Read "Clifford Brown’s Trumpet and One Summer in Atlantic City" reviewed by Arthur R George


For 22-year-old trumpeter Clifford Brown, the summer of 1953 in jny: Atlantic City, New Jersey, was transformative. Playing with bebop elders, he cumulatively opened the door for what came next: a groove-oriented swinging style, in which small groups used structured arrangements like big bands, with room for improvisation, but less frenzy. It became known as hard bop, or “mainstream." In early June, Brown went to jny: New York City at the call of Tadd Dameron. Dameron planned a ...

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Hardly Strictly Jazz

Marty Sheller: The Name Behind The Sound You All Know, Part 1

Read "Marty Sheller: The Name Behind The Sound You All Know, Part 1" reviewed by Skip Heller


There are certain musicians who embody eras, even if they're not the player with their picture on the cover. In our contemporary musical climate, Greg Leisz comes to mind. Since 1991, he has popped up on hundreds of acclaimed albums, and without ever really changing his style, he has become centrifugal beyond the considerations of genre —without having made an album as a leader. But it's difficult to think of the last 35 years of American music without him as ...

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Interview

Simin Tander: No Looking Back

Read "Simin Tander: No Looking Back" reviewed by Ian Patterson


When an album receives widespread critical acclaim, generating extensive touring in its wake, the temptation must be to repeat the formula next time around. Especially for artists operating in the niche world of jazz/improvised music, where a sure gig can be something of a holy grail, it would make little sense to fix what ain't broken. True artists, however, rarely tread water for too long. Simin Tander, singer, composer and improvising vocalist, is one such artist.

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Interview

Dan McCarthy: A Place Where We Once Lived

Read "Dan McCarthy: A Place Where We Once Lived" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky


By February of 2019, Dan McCarthy had reached the end of his time in New York. “The movers had come and packed everything up, and my wife and son were already in Toronto at my parents' house. I was at our apartment in Crown Heights and I only had a few things, including my vibes," he explains. With one full day remaining before McCarthy joined his family, and 15 years of Empire State memories swirling 'round his mind, he took ...

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Interview

Cote Calmet: Cultivating Afro-Peruvian Rhythms

Read "Cote Calmet: Cultivating Afro-Peruvian Rhythms" reviewed by Ian Patterson


What do a dead donkey, a Seat Alhambra and Led Zeppelin's John Bonham all have in common? Whatever images your mind's eye may conjure, these three clues, in fact, all lead to Phisqa, the contemporary jazz band of Afro-Peruvian bent, formed by drummer Cote Calmet in Dublin, Ireland, in 2010. But let's not get ahead of ourselves. Phisqa means five in the Quecha language of the Incas. It is the name that Lima-born Cote Calmet chose, ...


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